Monthly Archives November 2020

How to make a vintage German chocolate cake

Going through the r / Old_Recipes subreddit, I learned that you really can’t go wrong resurrecting a proven recipe from years past.

So when I told my stepdad, who would come to my house on his 70th birthday, that he could ask for any type of birthday cake he wanted and that I would find the perfect recipe, I thought so.

The birthday guy’s request? German chocolate cake.

After diving into the rabbit hole r / Old_Recipes, I discovered that another user had appealed for the best German chocolate cake recipes a few months ago. The answer that caught my eye was from Redditor u / BestOfShow32569, Tony Thompson, who collects old recipe boxes and cookbooks and posts them on his website, Vintage Recipes.

The Adkins Family German Chocolate Cake Recipe, posted on Vintage Recipes.Tony Thompson / Period Recipes

Thompson told TODAY Food that he found his recommended German chocolate cake recipe from a collection acquired at an estate in Tennessee that he said belonged to a family named Adkins who lived in Alabama and then Tennessee.

“The name Adkins, as well as an address in Birmingham, appear on a letter stored in the collection. Of course, there is a recipe written on the back of the page,” Thompson said. “Once I started processing the recipes, I found indications that the owner also lived in Tullahoma, Tennessee… The recipe collection appears to contain recipes from the late ’60s to mid’ 80s. “

The recipe called for shortening and buttermilk to create the chocolate cake batter.Terri Peters / TODAY

Although Thompson himself hadn’t tried Adkins’ German Chocolate Cake, I couldn’t wait to try it, so I gathered the ingredients and prepared my kitchen for a try. The recipe calls for shortening and buttermilk in the cake batter, so I expected a chewy and flavorful cake. And the frosting, which includes a stick of margarine and lots of coconut and pecans, seemed like the perfect complement.

When my mother-in-law and I started our prep work, we realized that we knew little about the history of German chocolate cake. After some research on my kitchen island, we learned that the cake is named after the chocolatier who created German chocolate, Samuel German. German created his special chocolate for the Baker’s Chocolate Company in 1852, and in 1957 the Dallas Morning News featured a cake using chocolate, created by a housewife in Texas, as the recipe of the day. Baker’s Chocolate started to circulate the recipe and the rest is chocolate history.

German chocolate was developed by chocolatier Samuel German for Baker’s Chocolate Company in the 1800s.Terri Peters / TODAY

We baked our birthday cake in two round pans, stacking it in layers and frosting it with the coconut cream concoction when it was cold. Although not all German chocolate cakes are served with the sides glazed, I wanted to cover mine. The recipe only made enough frosting for the middle layer and top of the cake, so to save time I took some cream cheese frosting from my pantry to fill it where it was. necessary.

Next time, however, I would double the frosting recipe, both to consistently decorate the cake and because it was so incredibly tasty.

A combination of margarine, coconut, vanilla, sugar, egg yolks and milk entered our pan to create the delicious frosting.Terri Peters / TODAY

And there will be be next time: The Adkins’ cake was decadent, chewy, and perfectly sweet. My in-laws liked it so much they had it for lunch the next day and then again for dessert that night.

And, like my stepdad, this German chocolate cake only gets better with age.

In the days following our anniversary, the flavors of the cake only intensified, becoming more and more sweet, chewy and chocolatey over time.

Our German chocolate cake after being sliced.Terri Peters / TODAY

Like most vintage recipes, the cake was a lot of work, but making a cake like this from scratch was a fun kitchen project to undertake.

Thompson, who has uploaded nearly 1,500 old recipes from various family collections to his blog, believes it’s this level of effort, combined with the beauty of an old handwritten recipe, that gets people to try vintage recipes. in their modern homes.

The cake only got better over time, providing delicious leftovers for days to come.Terri Peters / TODAY

“I appreciate these collections as works of art,” said Thompson. “A housewife or housewife spent time writing, typing, or cutting these recipes and organizing them into the system that worked for them… A recipe found and used from a traditional website is handy and effective, but an old recipe that someone took the time to write down has a personality of its own.

“And the fact that someone took the time to write or type a recipe gives the recipe some credibility from the start,” he said.


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How to make an omelet and chocolate cake in a cup

I’m all about quick and easy recipes – no mess and no stress. This week, I’m bringing you two delicious dishes that you can make in a mug… in the microwave… in minutes: a tasty omelet from the kitchen sink and a single-serve chocolate cake for dessert. Catch your appetite and your favorite mug – we’re about to do some mouthwatering magic!

Joy bauer

This rich, chocolatey treat is perfectly portioned, ready in under two minutes, and requires just three simple ingredients. It is incredibly rich and forgiving; I love tasting it warm with a splash of whipped cream and a pinch of cocoa powder. You can also customize this delicious treat to create your own delicious variation: Love mocha? Add a pinch of instant coffee or espresso powder to the batter. Bananas for bananas or berries? Incorporate some chopped fruit. Crazy about chocolate peanut butter? Mix in a teaspoon of your favorite nut butter. With this lean creation, you can really have your cake and eat it too.

Get the recipe here.

Joy bauer

This cup omelet is as easy as 1, 2, 3: one cup, two minutes, three basic ingredients (and no baking sheet required!). Each bite is packed with satiating protein, brain-boosting choline, and nutrient-dense veggies. You can use whatever you have in your fridge and leftovers are encouraged. Plus, for added flavor and delight, don’t hesitate to add your favorite herbs and spices. For an Italian-inspired omelet, opt for fresh or dried basil and oregano. Do you prefer Mexican flavors? Add the cilantro, cumin and smoked paprika. And, if you’re another heat seeker, drizzle with hot sauce. This delicious omelet makes breakfast a breeze or a snack in the blink of an eye!

For tastier recipes, order the new Joy Joy Bauer’s Superfood cookbook!

TODAY has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the income from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not TODAY.


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Election 2020 anxiety cure: my family’s secret chocolate cake

In a column I recently wrote on electoral anxiety, I mentioned that I had a really good chocolate cake recipe – and now several people have asked me for it.

Come to think of it, it might be a devil’s cake recipe, but I never understood the difference between chocolate and devil’s food. Anyway, this is a great cake that I make for everyone’s birthday no matter what. It came to me from my mother, Jinx McNamara, who got it from her mother, Mary Ann McNulty, whose name I am named. (I gave up Ann in second year, and sometimes I deeply regret that I did.)

She was known to her grandchildren as Mae-mae (hence the title of the recipe). Hers is not a recipe that I normally share beyond the family because, well, every family should have a really good recipe of their own. But it’s been a very tough year, and a very tough election, and so in case this cake could make anyone’s life a little easier, even for a few minutes, here’s how to do it.

(Disclaimer: This recipe has not been tested by the staff at The Times’ Food, so if you hate it, it’s all up to me. But you won’t, because Mae-mae knew what she was talking about.)

Mae-mae’s birthday cake

Ingredients

  • ½ cup of butter
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons of baking soda
  • ½ cup of milk
  • 2 cups of flour
  • ½ teaspoon of salt
  • 2 heaped tablespoons of cocoa
  • 1 cup of boiling water

Instructions

Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs and vanilla. In a separate bowl (I’m just using the measuring cup), add baking soda to the milk and let sit for a few minutes. Then add the milk to the butter / sugar mixture and mix well. Add the flour, salt and cocoa and mix well. Add boiling water and mix well again. Butter and flour two 9-inch round cake pans. Pour in the dough and bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Freeze as you want; it doesn’t matter because the cake is the thing.

Share with your friends at the refuge or eat on your own in the privacy of your own room – whatever gets you through. Repeat as needed.


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Election 2020 anxiety cure: my family’s secret chocolate cake

In a column I recently wrote on electoral anxiety, I mentioned that I had a really good chocolate cake recipe – and now several people have asked me for it.

Come to think of it, it might be a devil’s cake recipe, but I never understood the difference between chocolate and devil’s food. Anyway, this is a great cake that I make for everyone’s birthday no matter what. It came to me from my mother, Jinx McNamara, who got it from her mother, Mary Ann McNulty, whose name I am named. (I gave up Ann in second year, and sometimes I deeply regret that I did.)

She was known to her grandchildren as Mae-mae (hence the title of the recipe). Hers is not a recipe that I normally share beyond the family because, well, every family should have a really good recipe of their own. But it’s been a very tough year, and a very tough election, and so in case this cake could make anyone’s life a little easier, even for a few minutes, here’s how to do it.

(Disclaimer: This recipe has not been tested by the staff at The Times’ Food, so if you hate it, it’s all up to me. But you won’t, because Mae-mae knew what she was talking about.)

Mae-mae’s birthday cake

Ingredients

  • ½ cup of butter
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons of baking soda
  • ½ cup of milk
  • 2 cups of flour
  • ½ teaspoon of salt
  • 2 heaped tablespoons of cocoa
  • 1 cup of boiling water

Instructions

Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs and vanilla. In a separate bowl (I’m just using the measuring cup), add baking soda to the milk and let sit for a few minutes. Then add the milk to the butter / sugar mixture and mix well. Add the flour, salt and cocoa and mix well. Add boiling water and mix well again. Butter and flour two 9-inch round cake pans. Pour in the dough and bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Freeze as you want; it doesn’t matter because the cake is the thing.

Share with your friends at the refuge or eat on your own in the privacy of your own room – whatever gets you through. Repeat as needed.


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